Thursday, January 8, 2015

Black Holes

What are our chances?
We could look
for the primordial lifetime.
Although far away,
we observe such intensity,
frequency,
as if
there were
positive evidence.
Tell us
there can be more.
Make one source,
draw toward common times-
even if…

   Image by Mary Bach

Over at dVerse Bjorn asked us to try Blackout Poetry.  The idea is to find poetry in others’ words.  Simply select a book-page, print it and black out everything you don’t want. Copy down the text (keeping it in order). Add line-breaks and or punctuation marks as you want.  In keeping with the title I chose for my source A Brief History of Time (page 113) by Steven Hawking.  Here he talks about, among other things, black holes!  

50 comments:

  1. The mystery of the last line's ellipsis make that perfect tension. What an excellent example of a text to use... Amazing result.

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    1. Thank you Bjorn. This was a fun one for me maybe just what I needed to get my muse back/

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  2. intriguing....def a bit of a mystery....a quest even....ha....cool book you took it from...a tough read, but a cool book...

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    1. It is a tough book - reading it made my head hurt, lol. Thanks Brian!

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  3. So many questions... Lovely piece of writing.

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  4. Can look and look as one question leads to another

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  5. Your first sentence grips me. Wonderful blackout

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    1. Thank you Vandana. I appreciate yours comments.

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  7. Questions, mystery, speculation... You did well with that one.

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  8. Oooh... I like your source material! I may have to look at Hawking. The strength in your poem is the speaker and the tonal shifts that come with presenting the truths in the poem. Very nice.

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    1. Thank you Margo. It was a difficult read for me, but poetry is everywhere, right?

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  9. Your poem leads me into the unknown, even if....
    and I wonder where it will lead.

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    1. Lol, to be honest, I was running out of words that non-scientific.

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  10. Oh this poem of yours so fitting, so begging to discover it's end...even if...

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  11. the...there can be more... was the key here for me... def. some mystery in this that opens a space for the reader to put in their own thoughts and interpretation

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  12. I really like the inquisitive aspects of this poem. You probe the questions we all have. But then, it IS Hawking.

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    1. Lol, that's right. Remember the source!

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  13. Black holes are infinitely fascinating, as is your piece.

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  14. I love the emotion-laden lines you draw out of the science. The sense of pleading and possibility rings out, fantastic work!

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  15. Wow mary...good take on the prompt

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  16. The ever mysterious black holes ~ I like how you ended it, like a problem to be solved or for us to find the solution ~ Great work on the black out process, smiles ~

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    1. Thanks Grace. I enjoyed the puzzle of this process.

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  17. Will we ever find the answers to those black holes? There is darkness in those holes but, what is on the other side perhaps a new source of light.

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    1. Yes Trudessa. Or all the socks that have gone missing. Lol, couldn't resist.

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  18. wow... almost sounded like an article instead of piecing something together.

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  19. Since Assimov, since Philip K. Dick, I have felt that black holes are Time being folded back, twisted, & that they are the key to quantum leaps from universe to universe, the lips of cosmic truth perhaps; great use of Hawking physicspeak; like you sentiment "poetry is everywhere & in everything"; amen.

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  20. i love the feeling of hopefulness and mystery you've crafted here. really enjoyed this!

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  21. A lovely piece, along with a smooth flow to the words.

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  23. What a good idea, Mary.
    And what a great book ~ I have it on my bookshelf, read several times.
    Loved what you have done to the wording.
    I am pleased we were not all pulled into the black hole and hit it's singularity ~ very painful ~ yet we might just pass through it's event horizon and appear through an Einstein-Rossen bridge through a wormhole and into a new universe ~ in a way it would be good to start again all over . . . . lol
    Agree with Ayala ~ Very Cool

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    1. I'm just wondering whether you have fallen into the Black Hole . . . lol . . .are you ok?
      Hope you didn't catch this dreadful flu . . . :)

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  24. Obviously today's quite was about Other Mary! I am quite impressed oh quick witted Pilates princess.

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  25. I loved the poem and am amazed by how it was created!

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