Sunday, April 14, 2013

Springing


Spring, 1935 by Kuzma Petrov-Vodin 

    Spring is no time to be prim.
    Brimming with life and light,
    tightly bound buds mature and swell
    spellbindingly fresh and truly
    new.  And miracles abound
    found in each leaf and blade
    made just now for you.

Valencian fiesta an orange grove by Joaquin Sorolla y Batisda


This is a combination of prompts, with the first image from Tess at The Mag and the second image and the fom from Joy at IGwRt and it is also linked to NaPoWriMo Day 14.  The form is calleds Interlocking Rhyme and is described by Lewis Turco in Book of Forms as:
"Linked rhyme (or chained rhyme) chimes the laSpst syllable or syllables of a line with the first syllable or syllables of the next line…"  


30 comments:

  1. Not prim and proper? But no be seen or someone may call a copper.

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  2. I love that it is no time to be prim! ;D

    Fun to read and see the youthful view mature
    Gorgeous!

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  3. Hey, girl! I was reading and going...this form sounds so familiar, whoa--this is chained rhyme. You really use it the way it's meant to be done, with a graceful echo, but not overdone. Very springy, and I love the Sorolla pic you chose too. Thanks for playing in the spring mud with us toads. ;_)

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    1. :o) Heeheehee right-o Joy! Thanks, I love playing in the mud with the toads!




































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  4. Of course it's no time to be prim, it's time to be joyful and full of light and song as Joaqin Sorolla would have wanted! That man seems to have known how to live, as well as how to paint!
    K

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    1. Yes, I think you can tell it just by looking at his paintings!

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  5. Nice one - but here's a tip - your Mag link goes to NaPoRiMo blog! LOL

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  6. Ah yes, the magic of spring! Lovely poem, makes me want to play in a muddy garden :)

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    1. Yes - with the toads! Thank you Loredana.

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  7. There is something about Springtime that makes my 'prim and proper' fly out the window and upward for just a bit ... it's sooo liberating! Thanks for this admonition to let it all out!

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  8. Difficult form beautifully executed ... Happy Spring, Mary.

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    1. Thank you Helen - happy spring to you too! :o)

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  9. Your words have tied the two images together very well.

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  10. I like it! But that
    hat doesn't suit her frock.
    Mock not his brown cap.
    chaps can wear whey they like.
    Yikes - I'm interlocking,
    blocking the march of civilisation.
    Nations rise up. Put FTSE down!
    NOW!!!

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    1. Hahaha! How very silly
      willy nilly and completely,
      sweetly FTSE!

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  11. That was refreshing and fun, Mary, - new miracles indeed! I got caught in some confetti blossom today and it felt wonderful!

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    1. Ah, delightful Helena, (we still have snow here, but I'm hopeful). Thank you!

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  12. A beautiful poem on spring. I never tire from its arrival. Nicely written!

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  13. Great poem for both pics! I"m so impressed how you used the Interlocking Rhyme!

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  14. I really enjoyed the flow of this poem and wondered why.. and your explanation made me go back and examine it more closely. I think I have written one of these before, but not as well as you. "Spring is no time to be prim" really think that links closely with the Mag's image. :)

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  15. Your chiming rang my bell! LOL

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  16. Very Celtic, full of Joy. The grass be with you , i am sitting on the other pole, listinenig for his rattle at my door. Thanks for the comfort !

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  17. They don't call it the lusty month of May for nothing...

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